In 2005 WLCAC purchased the property that would become MudTown Farms, an urban farm and community wellness center. With later funding from the California State Parks Proposition 84 and the City of Los Angele's Proposition K, WLCAC built out the structures and hardscape. 
In 2008 WLCAC participated in a visioning process to improve the landscaping, amenities, environmental impact, and safety of Central Avenue in Watts.
From 2012 to 2016, WLCAC conducted a community design visioning process to reimagine the Watts Cultural Crescent, funded by the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs and the National Endowment for the Arts.
In 2016 WLCAC launched the Better Watts Initiative (BWI), a collaborative for environmental justice in Watts, in partnership with California State University Dominguez Hills.
In 2018 WLCAC launched its digital archives project in partnership with California State University Dominguez Hills.
WLCAC owns various properties in Watts and Willowbrook, serving various community uses:
Sites for WLCAC’s social services
  • Sites for WLCAC's social services
  • Provide subsidized low-income affordable housing
    • For low-income individuals and families
    • For senior citizens
    • For formerly homeless individuals and families
    • For formerly incarcerated individuals
  • Some sites include wrap-around social services
  • Some residential sites built or renovated with funds from US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
  • Provide commercial leases to business, education, or government tenants
  • Proceeds help fund WLCAC's social services
  • Reinvested proceeds can create additional housing and commercial development projects
Proceeds from these operations
  • Help fund WLCAC's social services
  • Can create additional housing and commercial development projects through reinvestment in the community

WLCAC's social services, residential properties, and commercial property management all provide jobs for local residents.

WLCAC RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES

KCET's Watts Action tells more about WLCAC's journey

Stories from early Watts residents reveal the area's agricultural past and explores the founding of WLCAC, including the vision of founder Ted Watkins. Bringing the story to the present day, Ted's son Timothy Watkins, WLCAC CEO and President carries the initial vision to build up the community through human development services and agricultural activities.
Dolores McCoy Villa I Is a 64 unit housing complex offering long term supportive housing for formerly incarcerated and homeless individuals along with their families. Housing includes a host of “wrap-around” services created to guide them toward complete independence.